Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are known to have excellent antibacterial properties and are considered by many to be a strong contender in the critical search for an answer to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. They block enzymes and can cause bacteria to have irregularly shaped membranes, producing results ranging from inhibited growth to cell death.

However, a collaboration of researchers from Kumamoto University, Keio University, and Dai Nippon Toryo Co., Ltd. in Japan found that AgNPs have a propensity to conglomerate, which results in a reduction of antibacterial attributes. They solved the conglomeration problem by coating the nanoparticles with gold. Unfortunately, this also caused a reduction of the antibacterial effects since the silver was no longer exposed.

This prompted the researchers to search for a method to keep the shape of the nanoparticles as well as the antibacterial properties.

Read more at phys.org

Image Credit:  Dr. Takuro Niidome

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