Better access to relevant and understandable information about nanomaterials both for European citizens and experts. That is the main goal of an agreement signed between the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) and the Commission on the European Union Observatory for Nanomaterials (EU-ON).

The signing of the delegation agreement marks the formal kick-off for ECHA to start working on the EU-ON.

The information sources for the observatory will include data generated by various pieces of EU legislation regulating the safe use of nanomaterials (e.g. REACH, biocides, cosmetics), from national inventories, research projects, and market studies. By that, it will bring added value not only to European citizens but also to policy makers, industry, NGOs and workers.

 

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Image Credit:     safenano.org

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