From an article by Mark-Lillie:

Technology leaders need to focus the raw potential of emerging technology into a set of priorities with measurable, tangible business impacts

Technology has moved far beyond desktop devices and software upgrades. It now incorporates data analysis, augmented reality, and reimagining products as services. In fact, the range of recent advances – from nanotech to robotic process automation – can seem overwhelming to any IT professional.

Companies must sift through the promotional noise to find those emerging technologies that offer real potential. It’s not about chasing every shiny new object; it’s about translating the raw potential of that emerging technology into a focused set of priorities with measurable, tangible business impact…

Beyond establishing trust, blockchain makes it possible to share information selectively with others to exchange assets safely and efficiently and – perhaps most promisingly – to proffer digital contracts. This transforms reputation into a manageable attribute.

In the next 18 to 24 months, entities across the globe are likely to explore blockchain opportunities that involve some aspects of digital reputation. This has the potential to rewire the financial industry and beyond, generating cost savings and new revenue opportunities.

These are only two examples of trends we expect to transform the way we all do business. Those leaders who can cut through the noise and harness the latest trends in technology will be better positioned to shape their company’s future and make an impact that matters.

 

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