(Nanowerk News) A strangely shaped depression on Mars could be a new place to look for signs of life on the Red Planet, according to a University of Texas at Austin-led study. The depression was probably formed by a volcano beneath a glacier and could have been a warm, chemical-rich environment well suited for microbial life.

The findings were published this month in Icarus, the International Journal of Solar System Studies (“Candidate volcanic and impact-induced ice depressions on Mars”).

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Image Credit:    Joseph Levy/NASA

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