Imaging at the nanoscale is important to a plethora of modern applications in materials science, physics, biology, medicine and other fields. Limitations of current techniques are, e.g. their resolution, imaging speed or the inability to look behind opaque objects with arbitrary shapes.

However, imaging like this would be useful e.g. for investigating spongy electrodes, thus helping to increase capacity and charging speed of next generation batteries.

In a research article published in Nanophotonics (“3D Nano-scale Imaging by Plasmonic Brownian Microscopy”), the team around Prof. Xiang Zhang from the University of California in Berkeley demonstrate a method with stunning properties.

Read more at nanowerk.com

Image Credit:  © De Gruyter

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