From an article written by Jeremy Agor at AZONano:

Nearly anything – from machine parts to food – can be printed on demand. Researchers now are exploring the technology to print human tissues and organs. However, the lack of good inks for 3-D bioprinting remains a barrier.

Kyungsuk Yum, an assistant professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department of UTA’s College of Engineering, has earned a $100,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to develop nanocomposite hydrogel bioinks that could be used for that purpose.

 

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Image Credit:   UT Arlington

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