From an article at nanowerknews.com:

Three-dimensional printing allows extremely small and complex structures to be made even in small series. A method developed at the KIT for the first time allows also glass to be used for this technique.

As a consequence of the properties of glass, such as transparency, thermal stability and resistance to acids, the use of this material in 3D-printing opens up manifold new applications in production and research, such as optics, data transmission, and biotechnology.

The process is published in Nature (“Three-dimensional printing of transparent fused silica glass“) and also presented at the Hanover Fair.

 

Read more at nanowerk news

 

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