A new study conducted by an international team of lung cancer researchers, including Professor John Field from the University of Liverpool, have identified new genetic variants for lung cancer risk.

Lung cancer continues to be the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Although tobacco smoking is the main risk factor, variations in a persons genetic makeup has been estimated to be responsible for approximately 12% of cases. However, the exact details of these variations have been previously unknown.

Genotyping is the process of determining differences in the genetic make-up (genotype) of an individual by examining the individual’s DNA sequence.

By gathering genotype data from different studies around the world, through the use of a special research platform called OncoArray, researchers were able to increase the sample size for this study making it the largest one of its type in the world. The Liverpool Lung Project, funded by the Roy Castle Foundation, has made a major contribution to this international project.

Researchers examined the data to identify the genetic variants associated with lung cancer risk.

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