On 15 June 2015, Springer Nature launched Nano, the first non-journal-type product to be marketed by the company within the Nature Research portfolio.

Nano is a database, but it is also a discovery tool. It is designed to provide researchers in academia and industry a simple way to retrieve information on nanomaterials and nanodevices. Over 200,000 profiles have been created, and each is based on information extracted mainly from research articles published in 30 journals.

By searching the database, users are presented with at-a-glance information on different types of materials or devices related to the keyword used, including composition and properties, and including the source articles and patents from which the information has been extracted.

 

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News

The nanoscopic structure that locks up our genes

January 18th, 2018|0 Comments

The new research shows that, although tightly packed, heterochromatin is perhaps less dense than previously thought. Made up of nucleosomes--roll-shaped bundles of DNA and protein--the heterochromatin is connected by a velcro-like feature called "Heterochromatin Protein [...]

Nanoparticle-antioxidants to treat strokes and spinal cord injuries

January 17th, 2018|0 Comments

An international science team has developed an innovative therapeutic complex based on multi-layer polymer nano-structures of superoxide dismutase (SOD). The new substance can be used to effectively rehabilitate patients after acute spinal injuries, strokes, and [...]

3D printed microfibers could provide structure for artificially grown body part

January 16th, 2018|0 Comments

Much as a frame provides structural support for a house and the chassis provides strength and shape for a car, a team of Penn State engineers believe they have a way to create the structural [...]

What if editing genes could fight rare diseases? [EU Science and Technology Podcast]

January 15th, 2018|0 Comments

  From a post written by Mihalis Kritikos, posted by Scientific Foresight (STOA) at the EU: A new technique to simplify gene editing might herald a new era of genetic modification. What are [...]

Health 4.0 as part of the HealthCare Innovation Week. January 16 – 17 in Düsseldorf, Germany

January 15th, 2018|0 Comments

Health 4.0 is a venue that brings together bright minds in healthcare to focus on the future. The biannual venue features great possibilities to network between payers and those offering their services in the healthcare [...]

Frank Boehm contributes to ‘The Physics of the Mind and Brain Disorders’ – Now available from Springer Press

January 15th, 2018|0 Comments

Frank Boehm (NanoApps Medical CEO) and Angelika Domschke contributed the chapter : “Application of a Conceptual Nanomedical Platform to Facilitate the Mapping of the Human Brain: Survey of Cognitive Functions and Implications”. The book covers [...]

Dr. Johannes Lierfeld – Do nanoethics exist? Nanoethics in the advent of advanced nano medicine

January 14th, 2018|0 Comments

  Dr. Johannes Lierfeld at the Innovate Healthcare Hackathon Cologne, Germany. "Do nanoethics exist? Are they a distinct field or a scientific phantasma? Forget that academic rubbish - we have to act now [...]

Internet of Things Advances with New Breed of “Memristors”

January 13th, 2018|0 Comments

The internet of things is soon to arrive, but not until there are chips and components that can tackle the explosion of data that arrives with IoT. By 2020, nearly 50 billion industrial internet sensors [...]

Innovate Healthcare January 12th-14th, 2018 in Cologne

January 12th, 2018|0 Comments

  innovate.healthcare is a hackathon for innovators passionate about disrupting healthcare with progressive ideas, creative thinking and active doing. We give you the opportunity to work on a real world challenge which we [...]

CRISPR Might Not Work in People

January 12th, 2018|0 Comments

A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the world’s biggest advances in genetic engineering. It’s in our blood: Scientists searched the blood of 22 [...]

First flashes of light observed from individual graphene nanoribbons

January 11th, 2018|0 Comments

For the first time, researchers have experimentally observed light emission from individual graphene nanoribbons. They demonstrated that 7-atom-wide nanoribbons emit light at a high intensity that is comparable to bright light-emitting devices made from carbon [...]

Using Silver Nanoparticles to Enhance Raman Spectroscopy

January 10th, 2018|0 Comments

Raman spectroscopy, a method that uses scattered laser light to identify molecules, has become increasingly critical to identify and characterize specimens on the molecular-scale. However, the technique has a limited ability to identify molecules in [...]

Team modifies nanoscale virus to deliver peptide drugs to cells, tissues

January 9th, 2018|0 Comments

By chipping away at a viral protein, Rice University scientists have discovered a path toward virus-like, nanoscale devices that may be able to deliver drugs to cells. The protein is one of three that make [...]

SaferNano Design and Law offers lab to market training for law business and researchers with nanoenabled products

January 9th, 2018|0 Comments

    Opportunity from Safernano Design and Law Graduate students can enroll for an intensive LAB TO MARKET TRAINING IN MAY 2018 Students will profit and benefit nicely from our Lab to Market [...]

Nanoparticle Designed to Destroy Harmful Viruses

January 8th, 2018|0 Comments

An international team of researchers has created new antiviral nanoparticles that show potential for outperforming current antiviral drugs. Current broad-spectrum antiviral drugs ward off viruses but don't actually destroy them, whereas the newly designed nanoparticles [...]

A Two-In-One Nanosystem to Combat Cancer and Drug Resistance

January 7th, 2018|0 Comments

Cancer is often referred to as “smart,” and this term often refers to the ability of these cells to proliferate without purpose or restraint. The ability of cancer cells to develop multidrug resistance (MDR), a [...]

Nano-medicine inhibits progression of pancreatic cancer

January 6th, 2018|0 Comments

Researchers have examined pancreatic cancer cells and discovered an inverse correlation between the signatures of miR-34a, a tumour suppressant, and PLK1, a known oncogene. The levels of miR-34a were low in pancreatic cancer mouse models, [...]

Macrophage nanosponges could keep sepsis in check

January 5th, 2018|0 Comments

A team of researchers at the University of California San Diego has developed macrophage “nanosponges” that can safely absorb and remove molecules from the bloodstream that are known to trigger sepsis. These macrophage nanosponges, which [...]

Physicists take first step toward cell-sized robots – Video

January 4th, 2018|0 Comments

  An electricity-conducting, environment-sensing, shape-changing machine the size of a human cell? Is that even possible? Cornell physicists Paul McEuen and Itai Cohen not only say yes, but they’ve actually built the “muscle” [...]

Carbon nanotubes devices may have a limit to how ‘nano’ they can be

January 3rd, 2018|0 Comments

Carbon nanotubes bound for electronics not only need to be as clean as possible to maximize their utility in next-generation nanoscale devices, but contact effects may limit how small a nano device can be, according [...]

Atomristor – memristor effect in atomically thin nanomaterials

January 2nd, 2018|0 Comments

In trying to bring brain-like (neuromorphic) computing closer to reality, researchers have been working on the development of memory resistors, or memristors, which are resistors in a circuit that 'remember' their state even if you [...]

Blockchains, Cryptoeconomics, and Emerging Technology Risks

December 30th, 2017|0 Comments

The recent rise in the value of BitCoin, whether a bubble or not, has stimulated great interest in the blockchain, and a recent opinion piece in the New York Times places it in the context [...]

Scientists Use Electron Microscopy to Study Magnetic Fields of Bacterial Cells and Nano-Objects

December 29th, 2017|0 Comments

A research team led by a scientist from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory has demonstrated for the first time that the magnetic fields of bacterial cells and magnetic nano-objects in liquid can be [...]

Fewer laboratory animals thanks to secondary nanobodies

December 27th, 2017|0 Comments

Antibodies are indispensable in biological research and medical diagnostics. However, their production is time-consuming, expensive, and requires the use of many animals. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen, Germany, have [...]

Nanowire device detects cancer with a urine test

December 26th, 2017|0 Comments

Cells communicate with each other through a number of different mechanisms. Some of these mechanisms are well-known: in animals, for example, predatory threats can drive the release of norepinephrine, a hormone that travels through the [...]

Plants that glow – Illumination from nanobionic plants might one day replace some electrical lighting

December 24th, 2017|0 Comments

Imagine that instead of switching on a lamp when it gets dark, you could read by the light of a glowing plant on your desk. MIT engineers have taken a critical first step toward making [...]

Nanomedical Device and Systems Design: Challenges, Possibilities, Visions – Discounted until Jan. 1 2018

December 23rd, 2017|0 Comments

  Features Explores and presents innovative nanotechnological and biomimetically derived strategies in the design of potential nanomedical devices and their constituents Contains several post-chapter Proposed Research Tasking Lists to facilitate the further investigation [...]

Light-up specks find and track tiny tumors

December 22nd, 2017|0 Comments

Scientists have created a method to detect tiny tumors and track their spread using light-emitting nanoparticles. The technology could lead to earlier cancer detection, more precise treatments, and even improvement in patient cure rates and [...]

Fluorescent nanomedicine can guide tumor removal, kill remaining cancer cells

December 21st, 2017|0 Comments

Oregon State University scientists have developed a nanomedicine platform for cancer that can help doctors know which tissue to cut out as well as kill any malignant cells that can't be surgically removed. The platform [...]

DNA That Folds Like Origami Has Applications for Drug-Delivering Nanobots

December 20th, 2017|0 Comments

From an article by Kyree Leary at futurism.com: In 1953, a pair of scientists named James D. Watson and Francis H.C. Crick — with help from the data supplied by the research of another scientist, Rosalind Franklin, — successfully [...]

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