What is Global Health Care Equivalency (GHCE)?

Looking ahead over the next 10-30 years, with the rapid emergence of, and synergies between, the disciplines of nanotechnology, nanomedicine, and AI, we can envisage a future world where any individual on the planet has access to the same advanced and cost effective nanomedical diagnostic and therapeutic technologies, no matter how wealthy or impoverished they are, no matter where they happen to reside, or under what conditions they live.

Progress toward this goal will be incremental, with each successive wave of nanomedical technologies being more advanced than the previous wave. The tipping point will arrive with the emergence of Molecular Manufacturing (MM), http://ieet.org/index.php/IEET/more/boehm20160115, which will make possible the cost effective fabrication of the classes of advanced autonomous nanomedical devices that Boehm describes in his first book: Nanomedical Device and Systems Design: Challenges, Possibilities, Visions.

A situation may then well arise where the entire human population will finally come to realize the inalienable human right of optimal health for life through the establishment of a worldwide health care system under the moniker: “Global Health Care Equivalency” (GHCE). The details and vision for GHCE will be articulated in an upcoming book: Nanotechnology, Nanomedicine, and AI: Toward the Dream of Global Health Care Equivalency that is currently being generated by the originator of this concept (Frank Boehm – CEO of NanoApps Medical Incorporated) in collaboration with numerous thought leading authors.

 

Read more at nanoappsmedical.com

Image Credit:    Alias Studio Sydney

News This Week

New Adjustments to Hyperspectral Microscopy of Nanomaterials

Hyperspectral microscopy is an advanced visualization technique that combines hyperspectral imaging with state-of-the-art optics and computer software to enable rapid identification of nanomaterials. Since hyperspectral datacubes are large, their acquisition is complicated and time-consuming. [...]

Through the quantum looking glass

An ultrathin invention could make future computing, sensing and encryption technologies remarkably smaller and more powerful by helping scientists control a strange but useful phenomenon of quantum mechanics, according to new research recently published [...]