Tumor-like spheres help scientists discover smarter cancer drugs

Cancer is a disease often driven by mutations in genes. As researchers learn more about these genes, and the proteins they code for, they are seeking smarter drugs to target them. The ultimate goal is to find ways to stop cancer cells from multiplying out of control, thereby blocking the growth and spread of tumors.
Now researchers from The Scripps Research Institute are reporting an innovative new method to screen for potential cancer drugs. The technique makes use of tiny, three-dimensional ball-like aggregates of cells called spheroids. These structures can be used to interrogate hundreds or even thousands of compounds rapidly using a technique called high throughput screening. In fact, by using this approach, the team has already identified one potential drug for an important cancer gene. The results were reported in the journal Oncogene (“A novel three-dimensional high-throughput screening approach identifies inducers of a mutant KRAS selective lethal phenotype”).
Read more at nanowerk.com

Image Credit:  Kota et. al./The Scripps Research Institute

News This Week

An AI strategy is no longer optional

At the New York Times DealBook conference, Intel emphasized it was urgent that every company put an artificial intelligence (AI) strategy in place. The reason, in a word, is data. The data deluge continues [...]

Artificial synapses made from nanowires

Scientists from Jülich together with colleagues from Aachen and Turin have produced a memristive element made from nanowires that functions in much the same way as a biological nerve cell. The component is able [...]

Updated – NanoApps Medical Inc. Near-Term Projects

NanoApps Medical is investigating the possibility that superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPIONs) (Figure 1) and other classes of nanoparticles (e.g., gold coated nanoshells) (Figure 2) might have the capacity to target cancerous tumors, metastasizing cancer cells, [...]

2018-05-14T13:12:56+00:00

Leave A Comment