AI-Based Technique Could Accelerate Creation of Specialized Nanoparticles

MIT physicists have developed a new method that could someday provide a way to customize multilayered nanoparticles with preferred properties, potentially for use in cloaking systems, displays, or biomedical devices. It may also help physicists handle a range of thorny research issues, in ways that could in certain cases be orders of magnitude faster than present approaches.

The innovation employs computational neural networks, a form of artificial intelligence, to “learn” how a nanoparticle’s structure influences its behavior, in this case, the way it scatters various colors of light, based on numerous training examples. Then, having learned the association, the program can fundamentally be run backward to design a particle with a preferred set of light-scattering properties — a process known as inverse design.

The results are being published in the journal Science Advances, in a paper by MIT senior John Peurifoy, research affiliate Yichen Shen, graduate student Li Jing, professor of physics Marin Soljačić, and five others.

While the method could eventually result in practical applications, Soljačić says, the research is mainly of scientific interest as a way of predicting the physical properties of a range of nano-engineered materials without necessitating the computationally intensive simulation processes that are usually used to handle such issues.

Soljačić says that the objective was to study at neural networks, a field that has witnessed a lot of progress and produced excitement in recent years, to see, “whether we can use some of those techniques in order to help us in our physics research. So basically, are computers ‘intelligent’ enough so that they can do some more intelligent tasks in helping us understand and work with some physical systems?”

Read more at azonano.com

Image Credit:  Vanderbilt University

News This Week

Frank Boehm (NA CEO) signs with IOP for Book on Nanomedical Brain/Cloud Interface

NanoApps Medical Inc. CEO Frank Boehm has signed with IOP Publishing to produce Nanomedical Brain/Cloud Interface: Explorations and Implications - a book that will explore the notion of a nanomedically enabled Brain/Cloud Interface (B/CI). [...]

Who owns what in outer space?

In 2015 Congress passed a law to legalise mining in outer space—the first of its kind in the world. Firms that some day manage to mine asteroids for resources like water or precious metals [...]

Public, permissionless blockchains and the EU’s GDPR: The coming clash between technology and the law?

From a blog by VALID advisor Christian Sillaber, Senior Researcher on IT-Security The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into effect on May 25, 2018. It is already clear that the new [...]

Women in Tech 2018: What the Statistics Tell Us

From an article by Ludmila Morozova-Buss on TechNative: Women have played a role in computer technology since its inception. Many credit Ava Lovelace as the first computer programmer, in a time before computers even existed, [...]

Minimalist biostructures designed to create nanomaterials

Researchers of the Institute of Biotechnology and Biomedicine (IBB-UAB) have generated four peptides, molecules smaller than proteins, capable of self-assembling in a controlled manner to form nanomaterials. The research, published in the journal ACS [...]

Nanophotonic System Translates Molecules into Bar Codes

EPFL scientists have developed a unique system that can be used for detecting and analyzing molecules with very a level of high precision and without using any bulky equipment. This latest development paves the [...]

Squeezing light at the nanoscale

Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new technique to squeeze infrared light into ultra-confined spaces, generating an intense, nanoscale antenna that could be [...]

Breakthrough in controlling DNA-based robots

Researchers have devised a magnetic control system to make tiny DNA-based robots move on demand -- and much faster than recently possible. In the journal Nature Communications, Carlos Castro and Ratnasingham Sooryakumar and their [...]

2018-06-05T13:39:03+00:00

Leave A Comment